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Training Physicians for Empathy

Ryan Chiavetta, for HealthLeaders Media, August 8, 2014

Mangione says a pending grant would allow him to start a new workshop for medical students to write and stage plays as a way of continuing to develop their empathic skills.

These programs aren't only helpful with dealing with patients, but also dealing with burnout.

"They loved [the Art of Attending]. They all commented on how not only how they were able to see differently, but also how this much this helped them against burnout," said Mangione. "There's very disturbing data that one out of two students burns out during medical school, and 10% have suicidal ideations."

While Klasko feels like the resident selection process is a competitive "cult" that needs to be changed, he is pleased with what he has seen from his organization, and that his physicians will leave Jefferson as seasoned professionals.

"That's what we told our docs," said Klasko. "You are going to graduate from Jefferson not being a tourist in creativity. You are going to graduate from Jefferson feeling good because you will know the science, but you are also going to feel comfortable in your ability in an uncertain environment."

Learning from Grieving Parents

A program in Washington State has the same goal as Klasko's work at Thomas Jefferson, but takes a slightly different approach.

Improving Clinical Management of Stillbirth is an educational session sponsored by the Global Alliance to Prevent Prematurity and Stillbirth (GAPPS) and the University of Washington. The program was created to give residents a better perspective of what parents go through during a traumatizing medical event.

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1 comments on "Training Physicians for Empathy"


bettynoyes (8/8/2014 at 12:13 PM)
I am hopeful that this will help a "Tad"..