Genetic tests give consumers hints about disease risk; critics have misgivings

Washington Post, January 26, 2010

Advocates of direct-to-consumer genotyping say these services can guide people toward appropriate preventive medical care, help them choose medications, and motivate them to make lifestyle changes. But others criticize the companies for overselling their supposed insights and producing reports that untrained consumers might easily misunderstand. The American Medical Association recommends that a physician always be involved in genetic testing, and the lack of physician involvement has made the tests technically illegal in several states, the Washington Post reports.


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