With nurses at risk of compassion fatigue, hospitals try to ease their stress

The Washington Post, June 11, 2013
Jan Powers, a clinical nurse manager in the pediatric oncology unit at the Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, remembers how hard it was for her team after the death of a child. They met with an art therapist, who brought clay. "There was a lot of pounding and kneading, and while we made our pots and whatever, people started to talk," she said of the session last summer. "When your hands are occupied and you're not in the spotlight, it's easier to say things like 'I feel really bad' or 'This child touched my heart and I'm grieving.' It gives staff a chance to create out of something that is hurtful and painful."

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